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Looking after a person living with memory loss can be extremely challenging. We are here to help you and your loved one through that journey.

If you are struggling with how to look after a loved one who has dementia, we can help you navigate the journey so that both you and your relative or friend, and your wider network benefit from expert advice and first-class care.

We understand the challenges, the emotions and feelings that come with the discovery of what seems like someone’s personality disappearing. But people with dementia are often able, with the right help at the right time, to live fulfilling lives in the right environment. While your relationship with them will inevitably change, it need not be a wholly negative experience for everyone.

1. Having the conversation about care

There are few discussion subjects within a family that are as difficult to initiate as the delicate subject of care with an elderly relative, even more so if there is a suspicion of early-onset dementia.

We understand how difficult this can be and the extra questions it brings up as a result. There is no substitute for speaking with a professional before embarking on this journey and there are many resources to hand to assist you.

Rest assured, you are not the only person who finds this difficult, many people do every day, across the UK. Here are some pointers to help you guide the conversation and avoid making a difficult situation harder for you or your loved one.

Read our three tips on having better conversations about care with a loved one.

2. Getting an assessment of the stage of Dementia

Dementia is how we describe a collection of symptoms that occur and prevent the brain from functioning properly, it is not a disease in its own right. Alzheimer’s Disease is the most commonly known but there are more.

Understanding what dementia is and how it progresses is key to us being able to help people. It is important to understand which home will suit your loved one the best.

There are different stages of dementia, and with those come different behaviours, some of which can be challenging. Spotting the early signs is a big part of being able to make sure that people receive the best care in the most appropriate environment. Ahead of every admission, we will carry out a thorough assessment beforehand, so that you can be as informed as possible and make the best decisions.

Talk to us about a Dementia Assessment

Choosing a care home for someone with Dementia

3. Listen to other’s experiences

It’s important to get an idea from other families about their feelings or understandings about the level of care their loved one is receiving.

Using carehome.co.uk can be an invaluable resource, simply head to their website and read the reviews from family members, friends of residents.

Here’s just one example from a husband of one of our residents:

“My wife is in Cumnor Hill House for respite. She suffers from MS and has problems with her walking. She also has the early stages of dementia and can be very confused. The care she receives at Cumnor Hill is extremely good. She has her hair and nails sorted on a regular basis and a physiotherapist visits every day to help her improve her walking. The food is up to high-quality restaurants and with a free bar, is out of this world. There are frequent activities for her to join in and assistance should it be required. I’m a Community First Responder and have been on emergency shouts to quite a few care homes locally but have not seen one to better Cumnor Hill in cleanliness and care”.

Read other reviews from carehome.co.uk for our home.

Contact Us.

To find out more about how making the decision to help a loved one with dementia is so important, contact us today on 01865 567 549 or email Ann-Marie Baker on relationsmanager@cumnorhillhouse.com

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